Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.42.20 PMWe are so excited that Patrick Ingram was listed as one of the 20 amazing HIV-Positive Gay men of 2014.  Patrick continues to do great work in the community to advocate, educate, and empower young people. He definitely works tirelessly to ensure that the LGBTQ community of color is represented at any table he is sitting at.  Congratulations Patrick on your great year so far.  The Poz+ Life is going in the right direction and we cannot wait to show you more of what we have in the works. Stay Tuned!


Below is pulled from HIV Plus Magazine's article on Patrick Ingram.  Check here for the 
digital edition.

 

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.41.39 PMAfter he attended the Young Black Gay Men’s Leadership Initiative’s 2014 Policy and Advocacy Summit earlier this year, blogger Patrick Ingram says he realized just how much pressure there is to act as if living with HIV is easy.

“The reality is, it is not yellow brick roads and rainbows,” he says. “Dating, making new friends, and even making new professional relationships are tough because of the fact that I am openly HIV-positive and gay. I do think, though, that I am finally free and at ease with my sexuality and HIV status and am hardly affected by those who do not want to deal with me because of their inability to address the HIV-related stigma within them.”

That straightforwardness has made the 25-year-old Ingram, who by day works as a health counselor for the Virginia Department of Health in Alexandria, a voice to be listened to. His popular blog on TheBody.com (ThePozLife.com, which he crafts with two other young black men) began in 2012 so he could “vent and share my journey of coming to terms with my HIV diagnosis. While doing this I also offered support and a listening ear to others.”

While it’s garnered the young man a legion of fans — especially young men of color so used to being underheard in the HIV discussion — he says he never sees himself as a role model. “Because I am not perfect but just simply human,” he says. “I never want to be placed in a situation where others look up to me; however, I want people to look at how I took my life changing moment and become empowered by it to take charge of their lives and any barrier they may be facing.”

He spends plenty of time on his blog educating people on treatment as prevention, what it means to be undetectable, PrEP, and why resiliency and mental strength are cornerstones of good health.

As more young people like himself speak openly about what it really is like living or being with someone with HIV, people may stop looking at the virus as “something that is not from a person who is dirty, irresponsible, or even dangerous,” he says. “HIV affects us all, regardless of things like socioeconomic status, significant others, family, friends, and education on the virus.”

Still, Ingram admits that one of his biggest concerns is the need for HIV-positive gay men to feel empowered and worthy. He meets plenty of men who “do not think they are good enough and therefore have to settle. In other situations they feel defeated and therefore do not feel like fighting to ensure they can get their medications, see their providers, have a second opinion, disclose their status to a sexual partner, and even stand up and address incorrect facts or lack of education among their peers. As HIV-postive individuals as a whole, we must know that our voice matters and that we are worth it.”

 

For the article click here
Don’t forget to check out more about our bloggers here
 
 

This year was the first year that I attended the ADAP Advocacy Association’s (aaa+) annual conference. I went there knowing that some states have AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAP) that are under some questionable measures and are causing many who need meds to be put on waiting lists and even some who have been experiencing trouble accessing care. My purpose in attending was to learn ways in which to support as an ally and advocate for family members, friends, and those that I work with in regards to ADAPs and the possible changes to come with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid expansion. Little did I know that attending this conference would touch me way beyond the spectrum of my current position as linkage to care coordinator, and allow me to connect with true champions in the fight against AIDS and become more empowered than ever before.

Day 1: Right from the start of the first plenary session I was introduced to Bob Bowers, One Tough Pirate, AIDS activist, educator and survivor. Living in the small city that I am from, I had never met such a warrior, so full of ambition, motivation, and courage to stand up speak on his combat for justice for himself and those living with HIV/AIDS. He absolutely blew me away. He was so real and so blunt that I almost wasn’t ready, but I knew that if he could get on stage and be so passionate about this fight, that I had to become more than just a health department worker; I had to become a rebel against those opposed to true nurturance, the true belief that diversity of any kind is indispensible to a truly healthy society.  

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 But that wasn’t all! The rest of the day consisted of breakout sessions on the topics of Africa’s use of technology to provide continuity of care – the use of an electronic health record system where clients utilized a simple health card to take to appointments that kept track of all their dates of visits, lab results, etc.; and HIV medication self-management – how individuals in one community were able to create their own intrinsic/holistic ideals of empowerment to deal with their diagnosis and manage care, all from many different walks of life.   The day ended with the wonderful launching of the ADAP directory…

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The fabulous invention of aaa+, a resource page full of word lists and links that handily locate AIDS Drugs Assistance Program information for all US states and territories! This is a way for those newly diagnosed or currently living with HIV/AIDS, those who are moving, plan on moving to another state, or just need to locate info within their own state, to review all the ADAP information and find ways of locating healthcare coverage and other financial sources; to improve the quality and accessibility of HIV/AIDS healthcare and support service organizations; and provide grant information. The best part is that the creators of the site are connected to the states info in a way that they are able to keep the information listed online as up to date as possible. So…as soon as something changes, their notified and updates are made!! How awesome is that?!?!? This is a way to keep people connected and even aware of changes that may need to be made or added in their areas. That’s true advocacy at work and making sure that we’re starting to push toward creating consistency across the US and its territories!

Day 2: Lots of information provided this day! A rep from the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD), “the voice of the states”, provided and excellent presentation on AIDS Drug Assistance Programs. As of February of 2014, only one state has a waiting list consisting of 35 people and other states that had previous lists are now on cost containment measures. Meaning they have put a plan in place to attempt to avoid tight budgets and not being able to provide everyone with the care and medication that they need.

More good news concerning this program is that as of 2013, the ADAP budget (consisting of Federal, state, and rebate dollars), exceeded a budget of 2 billion dollars for the first time! This means funding for the program is steadily increasing to where care and meds can be provided to those who need it within the ADAP income eligibility range of the federal poverty level.  We as advocates just need to be sure that within our own states, the money is actually reaching the people!

The day continued on with powerful breakouts from organizations such as Positive Champions Speakers Bureau (http://www.positivechampions.org), a group of HIV positive people who share their first hand experiences and the effects that HIV has on communities. They work to educate their community on the issues of living with HIV & AIDS and work to fight against stigma. This breakout allowed the speakers themselves to not only share, but also engaged the participants to share and connect as well.

I could go on and on but because there was so much information shared that I believe was helpful to both PLWHA and allies….but I don’t want to take up too much of your time lol. So I’m listing some websites that I believe are truly beneficial and that you should definitely checkout:

www.speakup.org – enables youth to make positive life choices and parents and educators to support them as they navigate the journey to become happy, confident adults (great resource)

www.needymeds.org – a national non-profit organization maintained website of free information on programs that help people who can’t afford medications and healthcare costs

http://www.panfoundation.org/ – offers assistance and hope to people with chronic or life-threatening illnesses such as HIV/AIDS in which costs is the reason for limited access to advanced medical treatments

http://www.lambdalegal.org/ – founded in 1973 as the nation’s first legal organization dedicated to achieving full equality for lesbian and gay people

Later that night, I met this fabulous guy…

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a fighter, an advocate, a trailblazer, a survivor…the true definition to me, of a believer. He is a believer of life, a believer of living, and believer of the fight being bigger than just himself. I was honored to have sat with him at the 4th Annual ADAP Leadership Awards dinner as he accepted the award for Social Media Campaign of the Year for himself and his co-creators of the The Poz Life. P.S. – you guys are doing amazing things!

Day 3: The conference ended with a town hall meeting in which all attendees met to discuss issues and set plans to go home with to continue working, begin new initiatives, and move forward in empowering others to join in this movement towards social/civil justice and equal rights.  

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So…as I left DC and headed back to my little old city, I thought about how if associations such as aaa+ remain in the fight to ensure care and funding is available, accessible, and awarded to those in need, programs such as ADAP have no choice but to remain. But we also have to become part of the battle and we can’t be afraid to speak up. If we remain in the background, watching as others struggle for our rights and necessities, then what are we doing? Why aren’t we helping? Are we really a part of the fight? Are we really standing up for what we believe in? If not, I think we have to then start asking, what do we believe in? What is our purpose? I think if we follow the quote made by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and read by the keynote speaker of the awards dinner, John D. Kemp, we can only go up from here…

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.”

By moving forward, we work towards growing our communities from repulsion, to tolerance, to acceptance, to support, to admiration, to appreciation, to true nurturance for all – believing that diversity is indispensible to a truly healthy society. And in order for our society to truly be healthy, we have to all have all be treated as equal and have consistency in access to medical care, medicine and other resources that keep us living in this fight TOGETHER!

On another note…I LOVE DC AT NITE!!!

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Rimage-2yane Hill, from Akron, Ohio is a  University of Cincinnati graduate with a Bachelors of Science in Health Education and Promotion with a Community Health focus. Currently she is working towards her Masters of Public Health at the University of Akron while working at Summit County Public Health with the HIV/STD Education and Prevention Program.  Ryane‘s dedication is working to educate those in underserved populations and communities on risk behaviors, prevention, treatment, and ways to access care while empowering them to self advocate for their health and future.  

Last month, the White House Office of National AIDS Policy hosted the much-anticipated meeting on HIV in the Southern United States. Federal stakeholders, policy makers, national and regional venton-e1396560969818advocates were in attendance to outline the current state of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the South and identify solutions for reducing the impact of HIV in this region of the United States. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the South has the highest number of people who are becoming infected and the majority of the people who are living with HIV in the South are people of color. During this important meeting, I had the opportunity to share my perspective as a person from the South living with HIV and also share recommendations for addressing the existing challenges around eradicating HIV in the South.

I am originally from Dallas, Texas. I grew up with a passion for health care as most of my family were involved in various aspects of health-care service and delivery. After obtaining my Bachelor of Science in Community Health from Texas A&M University in 2006, I moved back to my hometown to start my career in public health. I then completed my Master of Science in Healthcare Administration. My primary area of interest was health disparities and understanding its impact within communities of color. This led me towards an interest in HIV/AIDS and its disproportionate impact on Black gay men and men of other races who have sex with men (MSM). Early on in my career, I realized the stigma and fear that was associated around addressing the needs of this population.

During my time in Dallas, I was involved with a number of local and state-level HIV groups, including the Texas HIV/STD Community Planning Group. One of my first jobs in HIV prevention was working with United Black Ellument Exit Disclaimer. This project, funded by the University of California’s Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, aimed to adapt the Mpowerment HIV prevention Exit Disclaimer intervention for young, Black, gay and bi-sexual men, between the ages of 18-29. Throughout my work, a major challenge I faced while living in the South was around getting health systems to understand the unique social and structural challenges that act as barriers to effective HIV prevention, care and treatment efforts within populations of Black gay men and other MSM. These include, but are not limited to: racism, homophobia, lack of culturally competent service delivery and a lack of Black gay men in leadership positions throughout the community, HIV/AIDS organizations and government.

This part of the country is directly in the cross-hairs of challenges that persistently contribute to increased HIV infection rates and low rates of viral suppression. I believe in order to get the HIV/AIDS epidemic under control in the United States and ultimately, to move to an AIDS-free generation, we must continue our intentional focus on the issues facing Black MSM.

How are you focusing your efforts on those issue facing Black MSM? People in the South?

- See more at: http://blog.aids.gov/2014/07/black-voices-independence-from-hiv.html#sthash.PD0u8gjU.dpuf

IMG_4992I attended the 4th Annual ADAP Leadership Awards in Wasington D.C., and accepted the award for Social Media Campaign of the Year.  It was truly an honor  being in the room with individuals from all over who do fantastic work.  The experience motivated me to keep on with the work and know that it is meaningful.  Thank you so much again ADAP Advocacy Association Staff, Board Members, and Attendees for the experience!  The awards was in conjunction with the associations 7th Annual Conference.

IMG_4993We at The Poz+ Life love your support and feedback and continue to be motivated to continue the empowerment of others who are affected by HIV and other inequalities.  This is definitely just the beginning.  Thank you!

 

-Patrick Ingram (The Poz+ Life)Screen Shot 2014-08-11 at 12.51.16 PM

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“An agreement or a settlement of a dispute that is reached by each side making concessions” is the definition of compromise. Lately this is something that I have been struggling with, as it relates to my career and my personal life. I rarely share details about my personal life but at times I feel it is necessary; this is one of those times. My husband and I have had numerous conversations, sometimes arguments, about the balance of time for my career and our relationship.

For those who know me, know that I give a 110 percent to whatever I do. I like to world hard and unless I am constantly moving and contributing in some way shape or form, I am do not feel fulfilled. Some may call that being a workaholic but I think its being passion. When did working hard to be successful become negative?

At one point my husband felt that I work so much that I was not fully invested in our relationship. He also expressed concern that since I am HIV+, I should allow myself to rest more. Well the challenge was, how was I supposed to achieve my career and personal goals and still be invested in my relationship without feeling as though I was settling? I have always been very ambitious and driven. I know what I want to accomplish and in what time frame I want it accomplished. I didn’t want my career to suffer or my relationship but the truth was that I did not know how to balance. Yes I have been in relationships before but they were with men who were even more driven than me so to be with someone who not only wanted to invest in our relationship but wanted me to as well as an equal was foreign to me.

I had to understand where my husband was coming from. Yes my career was very important to me but I had to realize that my husband is my family now and that he should be a priority. If I expect him to cater to my needs and be supportive of me, I have to do the same for him. Sometimes this means not responding to an email once I am home, not taking a call or simply catering to his needs and wants and making him feel like he is my husband.

But also my husband had to be honest with himself and acknowledge that fact that he wanted someone who was not as career driven as I am. He wanted a husband who would take on the traditional roles of a “woman”. He wanted to be the provider. Hearing this from him made me realize how many times we as gay men still try impose hetero-normative roles in our relationships and forget that we are both two men who have very similar desires.

My husband and I had to learn three very key components for any relationship; respect, communication and compromise. In my opinion the hardest of the three is compromise and there is a huge different between compromising and settling. It’s difficult to find compromise as a couple but at some point the two individuals have to reach a point of balance within the relationship. And they have to learn to do so without resenting the other person. We can’t be naive to the fact that these concessions will be difficult and that someone may even feel as though they are settling but once they learn to get past emotions the couple is open to a whole new level of love and respect.

 

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Nova Salud put on another amazing event as myself and other individuals who are affected by HIV took time out of their schedules to model amazing clothes by Juan Jose Saenz-Ferreyros and his line Ferreyros Couture Company.  Thank you all who came out to give back to Nova Salud as they continue to provide excellent services to the Northern Virginia region.  Also, a huge thank you for all the sponsors and O Mansion for making this event happen.    

 

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For more information on Nova Salud click here.  

Originally posted on TIME:

Once HIV invades the body, it doesn’t want to leave. Every strategy that scientists have developed or are developing so far to fight the virus – from powerful anti-HIV drugs to promising vaccines that target it – suffers from the same weakness. None can ferret out every last virus in the body, and HIV has a tendency to hide out, remaining inert for years, until it flares up again to cause disease.

None, that is, until now. Kamel Khalili, director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple University School of Medicine, and his colleagues took advantage of a new gene editing technique to splice the virus out of the cells they infected – essentially returning them to their pre-infection state. The strategy relies on detecting and binding HIV-related genetic material, and therefore represents the first anti-HIV platform that could find even the dormant virus sequestered in immune cells.

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Meet the 2014-2015 YBGLI Organizing Committee Members

The Young Black Gay Men’s Leadership Initiative continues to grow in a number of different ways. This week, we are excited to announce the addition of four new members of the Organizing Committee or OC: Barry SappNoël Gordon, Leo Moore, MD and Patrick Ingram. Existing OC Members are: Anthony Roberts, JrMatthew Rose, and Christopher Shannon. The 2014-2015 Executive Committee officers are: Blake Rowley – Chair, Dashawn Usher – Vice Chair and Marvell L. Terry, II – SecretaryDaniel Driffin is Chair EmeritusRead YBGLI Chair, Blake Rowley’s “Welcome” blog post to learn more about his vision and plans for the Initiative in the coming year.

 

I am honestly excited about this project and want to see it succeed. Currently, there are no programs that discuss life living with HIV from a protagonist and their point of view.  This is something that we so desperately need to educate more individuals, break down stigma, but most importantly have something that us individuals living with HIV can related to.   Please check out http://www.unsurepositiveseries.com for more information on the project and the kickstarter campaign!

 


fc85e3031fe45518fddd2a7b49360d42_large https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jv4IoRSGvw Real HIV? Nowhere on T.V.! This series will explore many of the issues that affect HIV-positive people as they live on, and stay positive. Unsure/Positive is a Dramedy. What exactly is a Dramedy, you ask? Also known as tragicomedy, comedic drama, seriocomedy, or Unsure/Positive (the Series). Humor and Drama combined! A hybrid! The primary goal of the series is to entertain. Fair warning: we may entertain you *while* raising awareness about life with HIV. In an age of mobile devices, hookup culture, antiretroviral treatments, and the ongoing stigma that resonates with our own societal fears, Unsure/Positive offers a healthy dose of reality, honesty, and humor. You haven’t seen anything like this (because we’re still busy making it happen!) We have a fantastic cast, a baller crew, and we’re itching to get started– so much so that we already shot the first ten pages of our script on July 12th and 13th, 2014– well before securing our Kickstarter funding. The plan? To show you what you’re backing. Our sneak preview can be viewed right here: HIV is no longer a death sentence. That’s (somewhat) common knowledge… so much so that the other complications of living with the disease often get overlooked. The social stigma of an HIV-positive diagnosis is, on its own, a serious ongoing issue for “poz” persons. Unsure/Positive will explore this, and also the variety of situations– stark and mundane– that come up when human beings try to grapple with this complicated disease. With Your Help They Can:

  • Pay our professional director of photography, Ben Proulx (this is the guy in charge of the camera!)
  • Feed our cast and crew for (at least) 8 days (nom-nom!)
  • Pay our awesome, hardworking crewpeoples
  • Cover the cost of liability insurance
  • Secure a U-Haul for equipment pick-up and return
  • Buy cases of water for our set (You don’t know muggy till you’ve been in Boston in August!)
  • Buy a hard-drive on which to save all our footage
  • Buy a second hard-drive. (Just in case!)
  • Work with a professional sound mixer during post production
  • Work with a professional colorist during post production
  • And more!

Thanks in advance for supporting our project. We look forward to bringing you this brand new series very soon!


Unsure/Positive faces the challenge of combating the stigma associated with HIV/AIDS– many people are reluctant to fund the project only because of the negativity associated with these acronyms. One possible risk is that this stigma will undermine our efforts to reach a wide audience. We feel this is an ongoing challenge– but you can bet we’re here to fight the good fight. While stylistically our project is a “single camera” show, much of Unsure/Positive will be shot with two cameras. This means extra crew and personnel to manage the production. Translation: it’s not cheap! (But the good stuff rarely is.) We are very much a grassroots production and support from you, our community, will help make this project a success. Please let us know if you have any questions or concerns, and thank you for your continued support!